Mass Schedule

Mass
Saturday, 4:30 pm
Sunday, 8 & 10:30 am
Tuesday-Friday, 7:15 am

Reconciliation
Saturday, 3:30-4 pm

Eucharistic Adoration
First Friday each month
7:15 am-Noon

Centering Prayer
Tuesday, 5:30-6:30 pm


Find Us

Church & Office
1079 Summit Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55105
Map

Fr. Warren Sazama, SJ
Pastor

Fr. R.J. Fichtinger, SJ
Associate Pastor

Hrs: 9 am-4 pm, M-F
Tel: 651-227-7669
Fax: 651-227-0847

Email the Church


STM School & Office
1065 Summit Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55105
Map

Patrick Lofton
Principal

Hrs: 7:30 am-3:30 pm
M-F (during school year)
Tel: 651-224-4836
Fax: 651-224-0097

Email the School

SCHOOL'S WEBSITE

 

Justice and Service

two-feet-of-love-montageThe U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops describes Two Feet of Love in Action to which all Catholics are called: Charitable Works and Social Justice. Charitable Works (service) involves short-term, emergency assistance for individuals, while Social Justice involves addressing systemic, root causes of problems that affect many people. St. Thomas More’s Justice and Service ministries encompass both feet of love in action, with a mission of following Christ by serving those in need and building a just society. We invite you to “step with both feet” and become involved with our ministries. 

For information about Justice and Service ministries, send an email to justice@morecommunity.org. For more information about Works of Charity and Action of Justice, click the links above. 


care-for-creation
Care for Creation

Our ministry aims to provide information about climate change and to foster activities that reduce its negative effects. At the parish level we try to highlight practical steps we can take to reduce our carbon footprint and to foster hope and forward movement. We try to keep up with policy proposals at the local, state, and national levels so that our community can be part of a moral/spiritual voice on issues such as alternative energy sources, oil pipelines, and renewable energy standards. 

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This plain spoken, heartfelt letter from Pope Francis about our common home is intended to be read and reflected on by all. The first chapter is entitled: "What is Happening to Our Common Home."
Quotes:

18. The continued acceleration of changes affecting humanity and the planet is coupled today with a more intensified pace of life and work which might be called “rapidification”.

19. Let us review, however cursorily, those questions which are troubling us today and which we can no longer sweep under the carpet. Our goal is not to amass information or to satisfy curiosity, but rather to become painfully aware, to dare to turn what is happening to the world into our own personal suffering and thus to discover what each of us can do about it.

21. The earth, our home, is beginning to look more and more like an immense pile of filth. In many parts of the planet, the elderly lament that once beautiful landscapes are now covered with rubbish. Industrial waste and chemical products utilized in cities and agricultural areas can lead to bioaccumulation in the organisms of the local population, even when levels of toxins in those places are low. Frequently no measures are taken until after people’s health has been irreversibly affected.

23. A very solid scientific consensus indicates that we are presently witnessing a disturbing warming of the climatic system. Humanity is called to recognize the need for changes of lifestyle, production and consumption, in order to combat this warming or at least the human causes which produce or aggravate it.

26. There is an urgent need to develop policies so that, in the next few years, the emission of carbon dioxide and other highly polluting gases can be drastically reduced, for example, substituting for fossil fuels and developing sources of renewable energy.

33. Each year sees the disappearance of thousands of plant and animal species which we will never know, which our children will never see, because they have been lost for ever. The great majority become extinct for reasons related to human activity.

34. But a sober look at our world shows that the degree of human intervention, often in the service of business interests and consumerism, is actually making our earth less rich and beautiful, ever more limited and grey, even as technological advances and consumer goods continue to abound limitlessly. We seem to think that we can substitute an irreplaceable and irretrievable beauty with something which we have created ourselves.

46. These are signs that the growth of the past two centuries has not always led to an integral development and an improvement in the quality of life. Some of these signs are also symptomatic of real social decline, the silent rupture of the bonds of integration and social cohesion.

47. Furthermore, when media and the digital world become omnipresent, their influence can stop people from learning how to live wisely, to think deeply and to love generously

49. Today, however, we have to realize that a true ecological approach always becomes a social approach; it must integrate questions of justice in debates on the environment, so as to hear both the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.

52. The land of the southern poor is rich and mostly unpolluted, yet access to ownership of goods and resources for meeting vital needs is inhibited by a system of commercial relations and ownership which is structurally perverse. The developed countries ought to help pay this debt by significantly limiting their consumption of non-renewable energy and by assisting poorer countries to support policies and programmes of sustainable development.

53. The establishment of a legal framework which can set clear boundaries and ensure the protection of ecosystems has become indispensable; otherwise, the new power structures based on the techno-economic paradigm may overwhelm not only our politics but also freedom and justice.

57.What would induce anyone, at this stage, to hold on to power only to be remembered for their inability to take action when it was urgent and necessary to do so?

Questions:

1. The climate belongs to all and is meant for all, yet a disproportionate amount of the earth’s resources are consumed by the United States and other wealthy countries. What does Pope Francis propose must happen in order to address this?

2. What are you observing locally or in other parts of the country or world that causes you to think about climate change?

3. What changes can we make to our lifestyles, production and consumption to better care for one another and creation?

Resources
  • Pick up a brochure "On Care for Our Common Home" in the community corner

  • PLease share any suggestions you may have to help develop this series to: Care for Creation Ministry of STM: delelor@gmail.com

 

 
 
 
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